Liveaboard Advisor

Donald Duck Bay

Waterfall baySimilan islandsflounder in the sandcuttlefish bigparrot fish hiding in crevice
Donald Duck Bay is one of the most famous and most-recognizable view points of the islands because of its famous “Sail Rock” resembling a duck's head which is a symbol of the Similans. This well-sheltered bay at the northern end of Similan Island 8 is very popular in the Similans for 'beach breaks' for liveaboard cruise boats. In the evenings, boats moor this bay for night dives or early sunset dives, given it well protected location and mild to no currents.  Diving conditions are quite good here, the water is generally quite clear here.
Add a beautiful white sandy beach with the fact that the rock can be easily climbed for a rewarding view over the other islands, and this bay can be quite busy during peak season.  
This dive is a ‘one hour easy shallow dive’ with a nice combination of boulders and pinnacles particularly in the northern side and flat sand at a shallow depth about 20 meters maximum. There is a mixture of hard and soft coral bommies and a few sea fans round which add to the dive. Each one has its own little community of reef fish and invertebrates. The boulder section has some nice swim-throughs on the western side.

Donald Duck Bay

All about the dive at Donald Duck Bay
 
Many boats use the flat area for mooring, so try to mark your boat in mind. There is a mooring line near the northern pinnacles which can be used as a safe entry point.  With almost no current and Dive slowly across the reef, there is plenty of small reef fish and corals to be seen here during the day. Cuttlefish boldly swim around while octopuses are harder to detect.
This site of the Similan Islands is home to many Green Turtles and Hawksbill Turtles. They may attempt to ask for food from tourists. Please don’t feed them, however hungry or photogenic they seem. Firstly, their digestive systems are not designed for anything other than their natural diet of jellyfish and soft corals. Secondly, feeding change their natural behavior as they become accustomed to being fed by humans and could in the future approach boats or people which could harm or kill them.
The bottom of Donald Dick Bay is dotted with nudibranchs, starfish, sea urchins and sea cucumbers. There is more than enough to make a night dive at Donald duck Bay interesting.  Food scraps of the visiting boats find their way to the thousands of nocturnal creatures.  There are plenty of crustaceans like lobster, shrimp and coral crabs and invertebrates like squid, cuttlefish and octopus around. In turn nurse sharks can be seen hunting for them. In addition there are reef fish sleeping along the coral reefs such as parrotfish sleeping in mucous cocoons hiding its scent from potential predators. This mucus envelope may also act as an early warning system, allowing the parrotfish to flee when it detects predators such as moray eels disturbing the membrane.  Try not to disturb them by touching or by flashing your dive torch too long at them in their sleep. Also avoid going in the swim-throughs during a night dive. 
And make sure you return to the correct boat!
 



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